Biscuit, Cookie and Cracker Production

 

Author: Iain Davidson

eBook ISBN: 9780128155806

Paperback ISBN: 9780128155790

Imprint: Academic Press

Pages:  244   Published: July 2018

 

 
 
 

Key Features

  • Covers the complete processed food production line, from raw materials to packaged product
  • Shows, in detail, the process, production and packaging equipment for biscuits, cookies and   crackers with more than 200 pictures.

Contents

  1. The Biscuits
    2. Ingredient storage and handling
    3. Dough Mixing
    4. Dough Feed Systems
    5. Dough Forming: Biscuit cutting machines
    6. Dough Piece Forming: Laminating
    7. Dough Piece Forming: Rotary Moulding
    8. Dough Piece Forming: Depositing
    9. Biscuit Baking Ovens
    10. Oven Conveyor Bands
    11. Oil Spray machines
    12. Biscuit Cooling and handling
    13. Biscuit Sandwiching
    14. Biscuit Packaging
    15. Biscuit Production
    16. Ingredients for biscuits
    17. Test Bakery

Visit http://www.elsevier.com  

https://www.elsevier.com/books/biscuit-cookie-and-cracker-production/davidson/978-0-12-815579-0

Biscuit Baking Technology

PUBLISHED BY ACADEMIC PRESS 2016 An imprint of Elsevier

DESCRIPTION

Biscuit Baking Technology, Second Edition, is a reference book for senior managers and staff involved in industrial scale biscuit baking. It covers the biscuit industry process, ingredients, formulations, besides design, manufacture, installation, operation and maintenance of the baking ovens.

Written by an expert on the biscuit baking industry, the book is a complete manual guide that will help engineering, production and purchasing managers and staff in the biscuit industry to make the best decisions on oven efficiency purchasing.

CONTENTS

  1. The Biscuits
  2. Baking process
  3. Biscuit design and output
  4. Heat transfer
  5. Oven designs
  6. Oven specifications: hybrid ovens
  7. Oven construction: Direct Gas Fired Ovens
  8. Oven construction: Indirect Fired Ovens
  9. Heat Recovery System
  10. Oven conveyor bands
  11. Oven conveyor design
  12. Process control systems
  13. Oven safety monitoring and alarm
  14. Oven operation: Direct Gas Fired Oven
  15. Oven operation: Indirect radiant Oven
  16. Oven efficiency
  17. Oven inspection and audit

APPENDICES

  1. Ingredients for biscuits
  2. Maintenance
  3. Combustion data
  4. Oven manufacturers
  5. Oven band manufacturers

 

 

 

For more information contact Baker Pacific at bakerman@bakerpacific.com.hk

 

Biscuit Process Guides

Baker Pacific’s portfolio of product specifications, formulations and process data is extensive. It includes a wide range of biscuits, cookies and crackers. Our comprehensive Product Process Guides are available for each listed biscuit at USD 85.00. Each manual has the following details to enable you to make an excellent product.

CONTENTS OF A BAKER PACIFIC BISCUIT PROCESS GUIDE

Product Description
Product specification
Production output
Nutritional data
Formulation
Critical ingredients / ingredient specifications
Production process / Quality control
Production machines
Packaging styles 

Products available from our Portfolio:

 

 CRACKERS

 

 SANDWICH BISCUITS

 

HARD SWEET BISCUITS

SHORT DOUGH BISCUITS

 

COOKIES

 

 You may order a Biscuit Process Guide our Contacts page for USD 85.00 per product by email to bakerman@bakerpacific.com.hk with name, company and address for the invoice

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Process Guide for Marie

Marie is a classic hard sweet biscuit. Other examples of hard sweet biscuits are Petit Buerre, Rich Tea, Arrowroot, Morning Coffee. They are characterised by an even, attractive colour and texture and good volume. Doughs for hard sweet biscuits have the following features:

Button   Doughs have strong, developed gluten which gives an elastic dough, which is sheeted and cut. It often shrinks in the first stage of baking

Button   Doughs have low sugar and fat

Button   Doughs have water contents typically of around 12%

Button   Biscuits are normally baked on a wire-mesh band (except for Marie which is traditionally baked on a steel band)

Button   Humidity in the first part of the baking is important to achieve good volume and a smooth surface sheen

Button   Biscuits are baked to low moisture contents, around 1.5% – 3.0%

1 Hard sweet biscuits

 

Process for Marie

2 Marie biscuit

 

Description

Marie is a classic biscuit made throughout Europe and Asia. It has a light, crisp, delicate texture, with pale colour and clear smooth surface.

 

Product specification

Dimensions:                            66.0 mm diam.

Thickness:                                6.0 mm

Weight:                                     8.3 g

Appearance:                            Smooth surface, clear printing

Colour:                                     Pale golden

Texture:                                  Crisp and light

Moisture:                                1.5%

 

Formulation               (1)                         (2)

Flour                                        100.00                         100.00

Cornflour                                 4.41                             4.10

Maize flour                             14.70               –

Granulated sugar                    25.59                           21.67

Invert syrup 80%                     7.94                             6.67

Butter                                      –                                   4.87

Whey powder              –                                               1.67

Margarine                               –                                   10.00

Shortening                                11.03                           –

Lecithin                                      0.57                           0.50

Salt                                              0.88                           0.70

Soda                                            0.67                            0.58

ACP                                             0.08                           0.16

Protease                                     0.02                           0.02

SMS 10% solution                    0.02                           0.02

Whole liquid egg                         –                                3.33

Ammonium bicarbonate         0.73                            0.33

Water                                         26.47                           17.95

 

Recipes

Recipe (1) is a good standard Marie, Recipe (2) is a higher quality product.

 

Critical ingredients

1. Flour should not exceed 9.0% protein. Higher protein will result in a hard biscuit.

2. Cornflour and maize flour are used to reduce the total gluten content and make a more tender eating biscuit.

3. SMS will modify the protein to make a soft extensible dough.

4. Marie biscuits are made with medium protein flour and contain SMS to develop a soft extensible dough. The doughs are mixed on horizontal mixers to a temperature of 40-42 degrees C. The dough is sheeted and cut and is traditionally baked on a steel band.

 

Mixing

An “all in one mix” on a horizontal mixer. Mixing is critical to developing the soft extensible dough. A mixing action which kneads the dough without too much tearing and extruding is ideal. Mixing time on a typical high speed mixer will be 20-25 minutes. Marie doughs are mixed until the required temperature is achieved. The dough should reach 40-42oC. At this temperature it should be well kneaded and of correct consistency for machining. Higher dough temperatures result in unstable doughs. The dough is used straight away without standing and it is important to maintain the temperature.

Crackers 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baker Perkins High Speed Horizontal Dough Mixer

Forming

The dough may be laminated, but doughs made with SMS are usually sheeted without lamination. Dough scrap incorporation is very important and should be very even and consistent. The temperature of the scrap dough should be as close as possible to the temperature of the new dough. Dough sheet reduction should be gentle and should not exceed the ratio of 2.5:1.

Typical roll gaps are:

Forcing roll gap on sheeter:               18.0 mm

Gauging gap on sheeter:                    9.0 mm

1st gauge roll                                         5.7 mm

2nd gauge roll                                       2.5 mm

Final gauge roll                                     1.1 mm  (Cutting thickness: 1.3 mm)

The doughs shrink and require good relaxation before cutting. Separate cutting and printing rolls on the rotary cutter are recommended to achieve good, clear printing and docker holes, (piercing of holes in the dough pieces).

4 Errebi cutter design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cutter design for Maria showing the docker pin arrangement. Note the dough piece is cut as an oval shape to compensate for shrinkage during baking. Drawing and design by ErreBi Technology

 

Crackers 4

Baker Perkins forming line with rotary cutting machine

Baking

Steam may be used at the oven entry to achieve a high humidity. This will improve the surface finish of the biscuit.

Baking time:                5.0 – 6.5 minutes

Temperatures:             200 / 220 / 180oC

Moisture:                       Less than 1.5%

A hybrid oven is ideal with Direct Gas Fired zones followed by Indirect Radiant or Convection zones. The convection zones will dry the product well and ensure an even bland colour, but care must be taken to ensure a low moisture gradient between the centre of the biscuit and the surface, otherwise the product will be prone to “checking”. Adequate baking and cooling time are required.

7 DGF  IR oven

 

Baker Pacific Direct Gas Fired / Indirect Radiant oven

Cooling

A ratio of cooling to baking time should be at least 1.5:1. This will help to avoid checking (cracking of the biscuits after packaging due to an internal moisture gradient).

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Caramel

Home feature pic

All our caramels have  a long shelf life at ambient temperatures, stable colour, flavour, texture and moisture content
Our recipes and process inhibit moisture migration from the caramel to the biscuit ………. so that the caramel stays soft and the biscuit stays crisp
The caramels are made with European technology with only the finest natural ingredients, compliant with Halal approval and without preservatives, artificial colours or flavours

Our Caramels

Button    Premium caramel

A rich, creamy, smooth caramel with intense flavour

Button    Economy caramel

An excellent low cost caramel for sandwich and chocolate coated products. Made with alternative vegetable fats and re-constituted milk

Button    Honey caramel

A new caramel with pure Indonesian honey

Button    Caramel syrup

A simple caramel made without dairy products; good flavour, smooth texture and long life

We provide process technology for making our range of caramels, including formulations, complete process details and technical support

 

 

 

For enquiries and more information contact

Caramel Kitchen logo

bakerman@dircon.co.uk

 Baker Pacific Ltd. 3905 Two Exchange Square, Suite 7443, 8 Connaught Place, Hong Kong

Tel. +852 2522 1114   Fax.  +852 2521 1190

Training courses

Baking process and engineering – baking by infrared

  Individual company programs 

Button    The training programs are designed to suit each company’s requirements. Especially valuable for production management, engineering, maintenance staff  and oven operators.

Button    The programs include class work with Power Point presentations, discussion and  questionnaires. The training may also includes on-site training by our senior engineer. This can cover trouble shooting, oven operation, maintenance, planning oven up-grades and efficiency improvements

Button    Normally 2 – 3 modules are presented each day and the complete course is delivered in a 5 day week

Button    Each of our technicians has over 35 years experience as engineers in the biscuit industry in factories in Europe, Asia, North and South America

Post fig 1

 

 

 

 

 

Baker Pacific oven installations baking by infrared radiation

Training Modules

Complete course in one week

Day 1   Introduction / the biscuits / baking process / biscuit design and output

Day 2   Heat transfer / oven designs and specifications

Day 3   Oven bands and conveyor design

Day 4   Oven control / safety systems / oven operation

Day 5   Oven maintenance / inspection and audit / oven efficiency / heat recovery

 

Our training program has exclusive information on:

Button   All types of oven designs / direct and indirect fired / radiant / convection / re-circ ovens

Button   Specifying ovens for different applications for biscuits, cookies and crackers

Button   Setting standards and guarantees for suppliers

Button   Oven bands: types, tracking, cleaning, supporting on skids and rollers

Button   Oven efficiencies with actual data from trials

Button   Energy usage and energy loss

Button   Heat recovery system to save capital and operating costs

Button   Oven operation and maintenance

Button   Oven inspections and audits

 500 Power Point presentation slides

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Complete course given by a senior Baker Pacific engineer USD 4,500.00

(excluding travel and living expenses)

Alternative: complete course materials for in-house presentations USD 240.00

To order please contact Baker Pacific at bakerman@dircon.co.uk

 

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Crackers………………………..

Successful crackers from Europe, USA and Asia………………..

Cracker baking

A wide range of products characterised by crispy, open texture and savoury flavours. Crackers include soda and saltine crackers, cream crackers, snack crackers, water biscuits, puff biscuits, maltkist (sugar topped cracker), “TUC” type, “Ritz” type, vegetable crackers.

In general crackers may have some of the following features which influence the baking process:

  • Doughs which are leavened and fermented with ingredients such as yeast, ammonia and sodium bicarbonate
  • Doughs generally have a high water content (15 – 25%)
  • Cracker doughs are laminated, (the dough sheet is made up from multiple thin layers)
  • Cracker doughs spring or lift in the first part of the oven to achieve the open, flaky texture. This requires humidity and high heat input.
  • Some crackers are baked in strips or complete sheets and broken into individual products after baking
  • Some crackers require a colour contrast between dark blisters and a pale background colour
  • Traditional English crackers such as cream crackers and water biscuits are normally baked on light wire-mesh bands
  • Traditional American crackers, such as soda or saltine are baked on heavy mesh oven bands which are pre-heated to transfer heat rapidly by conduction into the dough pieces
  • Crackers are baked to low moisture contents (1.5% – 2.5%), which requires a high energy input

 

DGF oven

 

Baker Pacific Direct Gas Fired Oven for cracker baking 

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How efficient is your oven? – The products

Each product takes an amount of energy for baking for achieve the correct structure, moisture content and colour. The energy required varies with each type of biscuit, crackers, short dough biscuits and cookies. Each individual biscuit also varies depending on the formulation and quality of the ingredients and the final structure, moisture content and colour required.

Biscuits

Energy is required to bake biscuits as follows:

  1. The dry ingredients must be raised in temperature from ambient to baking temperature
  2. The water in the dough must be raised in temperature from ambient to 100oC
  3. Energy must be provided for the latent heat of evaporation
  4. The water vapour must be raised from 100oC to the baking temperature

The following is a guide to the approximate energy required for different categories of biscuits.

Rotary moulded biscuits:        0.17 – 0.20 kWh/kg of baked biscuits

Hard sweet biscuits:                0.25 – 0.27 kWh/kg of baked biscuits

Crackers:                                 0.30 – 0.33 kWh/kg of baked biscuits

Note: These are theoretical calculations and this is an approximate guide only. Calculations should be made for each formulation and baking profile.

 Read more with “Baking Process and Engineering” manual. 

Baked potato snacks

Production process

“Baked not fried” has become an established healthy, low fat choice for consumers in many markets. Potato snacks and crackers are baked with infrared radiation on Direct Gas Fired ovens or hybrid DGF/Indirect Radiant ovens.

DGF-IR oven

Baker Pacific Direct Gas Fired / Indirect Radiant oven

The production process for potato snacks follows that for crackers and wheat based snacks quite closely. With some modification, cracker lines can produce baked potato snacks in addition to potato crackers.

Potato crackers from Khong Guan, Indonesia                           Potato snacks from Walkers, UK

The ingredients for baked potato snacks may be mixed on continuous mixers or on horizontal high speed mixers with suitable modifications or on plough share type mixers with bottom discharge. All the dry ingredients are blended, fat is added and finally water is added. Horizontal high speed mixers require a steam jacket and suitable modifications to the bearings and seals. The dough is heated during mixing to gelatinise the starches.

HS mixer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APV Baker High Speed Mixer

The dough is sheeted and gauged to produce a dough sheet of approximately 0.75mm thickness. Potato doughs are tough and require heavy duty forming equipment. The robustness and accuracy of the gauging equipment is critical as variations in thickness of the snacks will cause variations in colour after baking. Achieving the minimum variation in thickness requires large diameter gauge rolls, 400mm diameter and these may be of solid construction to minimise deflection.

gauge rolls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy duty gauge rolls from Baker Perkins

 

Ripple snacks are formed on a final gauge roll unit, which has grooved rolls, which intermesh to form the ripple in the dough sheet. By using one plain and one grooved roll, other forms such as hollow flutes can be made. These rolls only form the dough sheet and do not alter the thickness. When making plain products the ripple roll gap is opened to allow the product to pass through without ripples.

Pic 5

 

After gauging, the snacks are cut by a rotary cutter. The scrap dough is lifted and may be milled before returning to the mixer. Cracker doughs which have a strong, extensible dough sheet may be returned to the sheeter.

Triangle snacks

 

Potato snacks are baked on pre-heated Z47 type wire mesh or heavy mesh oven bands, such as Ashworth CB5. The ovens require high radiant heat and may be either a Direct Gas Fired (DGF) oven or hybrid DGF / Indirect Radiant oven. Convection ovens are unsuitable as the convective air will disturb the very light snacks on the band and will cause snacks to be blown off the band. Baking times are of the order of 4 minutes and the output of a 1.0m x 40m oven will typically be around 500kgs / hour.

About - ovens

Baker Pacific Radiant oven baking by infrared radiation

The snacks are conveyed directly to the oil spray and flavour applicator. The flavours may be added to the oil and the slurry pumped through the oil spray. This method has the disadvantage of possible blockages and increased cleaning time, particularly where more than one flavour is applied on the same line. The alternative is to use a flavour applicator after the oil spray machine. The flavour is metered on to the snacks while they are agitated in a rotating drum. After flavouring the snacks are cooled and conveyed to packaging.

Storeveyor

 

 

Storeveyor for potato chips from Gough Engineering

Packaging is usually a vertical Form fill seal pack, but may also be a block bottomed bag or a bag in a box.

Crinklys - Walkers packs

Crinklys potato snacks from Jacobs and Walkers Baked from UK

 

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Indonesian Snacks

Our new market report on Indonesian snacks is now being prepared. Indonesia is particularly rich in the variety of snacks made and consumed. Our report will include over 150 snacks from: beans, bread fruit, cassava, chicken, coconut, corn, emping, fish, fruit, meat, nuts, peas, potato, rice, sago, soya, tapioca, taro, wheat flour. Our report will be “live”. It will be regularly up-dated for our customers and they will be able to request samples and additional information.

Over 150 snacks featured from:

beans, bread fruit, cassava, chicken, coconut, corn, emping, fish, fruit, meat, nuts, peas, potato, rice, sago, soya, tapioca, taro, tempe, wheat flour

The report will be published in 2015 by Baker Pacific Ltd. and will cost USD 250.00.